By Nathan L. Cartagena In high school, I rarely took classes with other Christians. This wasn’t intentional. It was the outcome of taking “advanced courses” in a school with “advanced students” who had rejected Christianity by middle school. So though I craved the presence of other Christians—a presence which Dietrich Bonhoeffer observes ‘is a source of incomparable joy and strength to the believer”—it wasn’t to be had. Worse still, my colleagues relished taking opportunities to bash Christians. I vividly remember their…